Methuen police and Front Line Services last month officially launch the Police Assisted Therapeutic Help (PATH) Program, a U.S. Department of Justice funded community-focused program aimed at helping those experiencing behavioral-health challenges.

“The PATH Program will provide a robust response to community behavioral health concerns and will include a Crisis Intervention Team comprised of an officer and clinician providing direct response to mental health crises; a Community Response Team comprised of a clinician and peer specialist providing assistance, outreach and education to the community of Methuen; and a

PATH Rapid Outpatient team to provide immediate access to short-term outpatient services for those in need,” according to a press release.

“The over-arching goal of the PATH program is to serve the community in the community to build resiliency,” said Front Line President and CEO Matthew Page-Shelton. “We are excited to launch this program and to begin making a real difference on the streets of Methuen.”

“The launch of our PATH Program marks a major milestone in our department-wide effort to improve our responses to behavioral health issues within the community,” said Chief Scott McNamara. “We are committed to providing the best possible responses to behavioral health issues, and this innovative and comprehensive new program will go a long way toward improving our services.”

Marking the launch of the Police Assisted Therapeutic Help (PATH) Program, a U.S. Department of Justice-funded, community-focused program aimed at helping those experiencing behavioral-health challenges, are (from left) Police Lt. James Gunter, Methuen Mayor Neil Perry, Police Chief Scott McNamara, Officer Gina Scanlon, Clinician Krystal Demmons, Front Line CEO and President Matthew Page-Shelton, and Methuen Police Director of Crime Analysis and Strategic Projects Dawn Reeby. Courtesy photo